Overused phrases hiring managers should keep in mind

Posted by EmployTest - on Oct 12, 2017 11:40:10 AM

The following one-liners can come across as negative, shedding light on the wrong type candidate for your company.
The following one-liners can come across as negative, shedding light on the wrong type candidate for your company.

The interview process can be stressful and overwhelming for some candidates, while others find in exciting and exhilarating. Regardless of how the situation makes individuals feel, however, there are a number of often-repeated and annoying phrases you, as a hiring manager, should keep in mind. The following lines can come across as negative, shedding light on the wrong type candidate for your company:

1. "No problem" or "no worries"
Often referred to as filler phrases, according to Forbes contributor Trudy Steinfeld, these statements should rarely, if ever be used as answers during an interview. "No problem" or "no worries" omits that the candidate will "deal with it," or the problem on the job, and that's not seen as a positive response.

"Everyone has worries, and unless you are an Aussie and can say it with an appropriate accent – adding "mate" to top it off – then it's best avoided," said Steinfeld, speaking to job seekers.

2. "I'm a quick learner"
Some may see this as the line that'll get them the job, but that's not exactly the case. Though often spoken with positivity, hope and confidence, this phrase indicates that candidates have limited experience in performing one of the tasks of the position. This can come across as a negative statement during an interview. Candidates shouldn't point out limited experience in the particular area - instead, Glassdoor recommended waiting for interviewees to highlight correlating tasks that they've mastered at a different job, shining light on a similar skill that makes them eligible to learn new tasks quickly.

3. "I'm an extremely motivated person"
This is a one-liner that comes across as a desperate measure during an interview. It's another filler phrase that interviewees throw in there when they've run out of things to talk about. Instead of making a statement about being motivated, candidates should prove it to you by bragging about past experience. Anticipate a slew of examples that show how motivated the interviewee is in the workplace.

Instead of stressing how motivated you are, prove it to the hiring manager with examples.Look for candidates who can prove how motivated they are through examples of past experience.

4. "My former co-workers didn't carry their weight"
No matter how much effort a candidate has dedicated to making up for a former co-workers' laziness during a project in the past, it should never be brought up during an interview. It sounds extremely unprofessional and is a major red flag, according to Steinfeld.

"Badmouthing former colleagues or other students is always viewed poorly, even if you try to spin it by saying something like "my teammates did not carry their weight on the project, so I had to do the heavy lifting," she said, speaking to a good example of a bad experience.  "Never ever give up your colleagues.  It's simply bad form and a sets alarm bells ringing with interviewers everywhere."

5. "I can do anything you need me to do"
A phrase that often reeks of desperation, this line puts a target on the candidate's back, giving you the wrong idea about him or her right off the bat. As Steinfeld stated, this phrase is often followed by your own internal thought of 'No, you probably can't.' Making such a bold statement in the early stages of an interview often wrecks the credibility of a potentially good candidate.

While you are most definitely in control of the interview, it's important to collect how the candidate presents him or herself when describing past experience. If they oversell themselves, you may find that they're potentially overqualified to fill the position, or perhaps too vain to fit in with the company. Keep these over-used phrases in mind during your next slew of interviews.

Would you like a sample of our pre-employment tests?  Just visit Try a Test to get started!

Tags: Hiring Tips